San Josef Bay and Cape Scott

Depending on the courses chosen, the run from Cape Scott to the entrance of Quatsino Sound is approximately 28.5 miles.  To stay clear of off-lying rocks and reefs, the general advice is to follow the 20 fathom curve all the way down the coast.  Douglass says he prefers the 30 fathom curve for an extra margin of safety.  We are inclined toward Douglass 30-fathom standard.  In moderate conditions with excellent visibility, we felt comfortable in 25 – 30 fathoms.  Had conditions worsened, we would have moved out.

With the summer westerly in place, the run between Cape Scott and Quatsino Sound is a downhell sleigh ride.  Powerboaters, especailly those with planing hulls, will have to saw away at the helm and play with the throttle to stay in harmony with the relentless procession of rollers.  They will arrive tired.  The sailboaters will have all the fun, especially if the boat and crew can handle a spinnaker.  The too will arrive tired, but exhilarted.

Given the conditions, many boats make a direct passage between Cape Scott and Quatsino Sound, and leave the bays between for another day.  Sailboats, after a long passage at 6 knots, will apt to put into one of those bays, particularly Sea Otter Cove.  They could make an early departure the next morning round Cape Scott before the westerly fills in.

San Josef Bay is protected from northerly winds, but open to westerly and southerly winds.  Anchore in settled weather.

Weather information.  At he north end, the Cape Scott lighthouse weather report informs mariners of wind and sea conditons.  At the south end, the Quatsino lighthouse report does the same  Listen to the coninous marine boardast for the latest weather information.

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